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A multilevel approach to individual and organizational predictors of stress and fatigue among healthcare workers of a university hospital: A longitudinal study

Abstract : Objective Healthcare workers are at high risk of experiencing stress and fatigue due to the demands of their work within hospitals. Improving their physical and mental health and in turn, the quality and safety of care, requires considering factors at both individual and organizational levels. Using a multi-center prospective cohort, this study aims to identify the individual and organizational predictors of stress and fatigue of healthcare workers in several wards from university hospitals. Methods Our cohort consist of 695 healthcare workers from 32 hospital wards drawn at random within four volunteer hospital centers in Paris-area. Three-level longitudinal analyses, accounting for repeated measures (level 1) across participants (level 2) nested within wards (level 3) and adjusted for relevant fixed and time varying confounders were performed. Results At baseline, the sample was composed by 384 registered nurses, 300 auxiliary nurses and 11 midwives. According to the 3-level longitudinal models, some predictors were found in common for both stress and fatigue (low support from the hierarchy, low safety culture, overcommitment at work, presenteeism while sick…). However, specific predictors for high level of stress (negative life events, low support from the colleagues and high frequency of break cancellation) and fatigue (commuting duration, frequent use of interim staff in the ward…) were also found. Conclusion Our results may help identify at-risk healthcare workers and wards, where interventions to reduce stress and fatigue should be focused. These interventions could include manager training to favor better staff support and overall safety culture of healthcare workers. 1. What is already known about this subject? Healthcare workers have high levels of perceived stress and fatigue, particularly in medical fields highly exposed to infectious risks. High occupational stress and fatigue can negatively affect healthcare workers behaviors in terms of absenteeism, and ultimately intention to leave as well as quality of care. Individual and organizational differences contribute to different perceptions and consequences of occupational stress and fatigue in healthcare workers. 2. What are the new findings? The ward-level environment significantly influences the stress and fatigue of healthcare workers, in addition to individual factors and time variations. Hierarchy providing low support and with low safety culture, work overinvestment, presenteeism while sick, and working in smaller wards were identified as predictors of both high stress and fatigue of healthcare workers. Negative life events (whether personal or professional), low support from the colleagues and high frequency of break cancellation are specific predictors of high level of stress. While commuting duration, frequent use of interim staff and working in a medical ward were associated with high level of fatigue. 3. How might this impact on policy or clinical practice in the foreseeable future? In this study, we can identify some areas for improvement to better prevent stress and fatigue for healthcare workers. High stress and fatigue can be reduced through mutual and specific organizational intervention strategies.
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Preprints, Working Papers, ...
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https://hal-cnam.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-03587531
Contributor : Aurélie Puybonnieux Connect in order to contact the contributor
Submitted on : Thursday, February 24, 2022 - 3:22:13 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, September 28, 2022 - 5:59:45 AM
Long-term archiving on: : Wednesday, May 25, 2022 - 8:20:34 PM

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Oumou Daouda, René Bun, Karim Bouziad, Katiuska Miliani, Anastasia Essa-Eworo, et al.. A multilevel approach to individual and organizational predictors of stress and fatigue among healthcare workers of a university hospital: A longitudinal study. 2022. ⟨hal-03587531⟩

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